“Ships of wood and men of iron” – Bringing our sitters back to life

In a recent post about creatively reimagining the Knights-Whittome collection through fictional writing we observed how difficult it can be to really empathise with an individual when just faced with a list of bare facts.   It is not often that we are privy to a real life observation about one of our sitters than gives…

Ellen Munday: Life as an independent servant

Research today, comes from our wonderful volunteer Elizabeth, who has worked hard to track down information about a lady from the collection, Ellen Munday, as well as the family for whom she worked for during the time the photograph was taken.  The story leaves many questions still to be answered but certainly gives a fascinating…

Conserving the Collection – Multi Spectral Imaging Microscopy

Following on from Emma Bonson’s blog last week on using X-Ray to investigate blocked plates,  Ellie Pierce, a conservation student at the University of Lincoln, continues our conservation series by telling us about her experience of using a Multi Spectral Imaging Microscope to investigate the plates. Thanks to Ellie for today’s piece… On Monday the…

Conserving the Collection: Blocked Negatives and Investigation Techniques

Today’s post comes from Emma Bonson, one of our wonderful conservation team and is a follow on piece to one written by Sarah Allen back in July about delaminating emulsion on our glass plates. We’ve been very lucky to work with Sarah and Emma who have bent over backwards to try and solve some of…

Rudolph Vincent Surr 1891-1916

Today’s post is the combined work of two volunteers, Tony McGarry who has a particular interest in the soldiers in our collection, and who carried out the initial research on this subject and Elizabeth Cooper who wrote the research up into today’s wonderful blog piece. Elizabeth is new to the project but an experienced researcher…

The Art of Retouching – Pre-Photoshop

A recent post we published on this blog touched on the subject of Retouching Glass Plates. It’s something I promised to look at in more detail on the blog a while ago, and following a recent talk to Carshalton Photographic Society on the very subject over the summer, I’ve realised it is long overdue. A…